Hosting · AWS

Amazon or Rackspace or Azure?

Sridhar Alla Big Data Architect, Engineer, Trainer and Agile practitioner

December 18th, 2012

I am looking for suggestions on which provider is good for a startup.

#1 flexibility in controlling my own applications and configurations
including Hadoop,HBase, Radoop etc
#2 price point to make it economical as i expand as i will invest myself
for first few months at least and need at least 64GB or more in terms of RAM.


Anonymous

December 18th, 2012

Sridhar,

You\'re going to want to go with AWS to get the kind of flexibility you\'ll
want to have for Hadoop. I don\'t think that Rackspace even has anything in
their Cloud Servers offering that will get you close to 64GB+ RAM, but AWS
has several instance types that will get you there.

I hate to pimp my own project when answering a question like this, but
we\'re building a "Heroku for big data" that manages your Hadoop (or Spark
or Storm) infrastructure on top of AWS, making it as easy as Heroku to
deploy big data apps to the cloud. This may not line up with your
deployment timeline, but we\'ll be coming out in private beta in a few
months. Check it out: http://www.scalacity.com

Bryan

Rob Sterner Full Stack Web Developer

December 18th, 2012

I\'m in the process of migrating production infrastructure away from Rackspace onto AWS. We deemed Rackspace to be immature for a variety of reasons that I\'ll elaborate on privately if you\'d like.

Out of curiosity, have you looked at heroku? I know you\'d be yielding some control initially but if your technology stack is supported by them or by one of their integrated partners it is, by far, the easiest way to get a web app bootstrapped and publicly accessible. In my experience getting something out there ASAP is awfully important toward building/keeping momentum going for a project.

HTH,

Rob

Hayden Tay Marketing and Customer Success Manager at ChargeSpot Wireless Power

December 18th, 2012

Just in general and in response to the Azure question, I wanted to remind
everyone that as FD members you are automatically eligible to join the
Microsoft BizSpark program, a community of almost 50,000 startups, their
founders and partner ecosystem. Joining The BizSpark program is free of
charge and affords you access to:

- *Global Community* of companies and entrepreneurs - including Zirtual,
Graphic.ly, Pageonce, Loopt,
- *Latest Microsoft technology *� FREE OF CHARGE.
- *Partner Network* - over 2,300 partners around the world-incubators,
investors, accelerators, advisors, government agencies, mentoring groups,
hosters - all involved in supporting software-fueled innovation and the
next generation of technology entrepreneurs.
- *Exclusive Offers *- software development and other tools/services to
help build your co. -
http://www.microsoft.com/**bizspark/Offers/<http://www.microsoft.com/bizspark/Offers/>

No, you do not have to be building on .NET in order to qualify :). *To
learn more about the value and to join BizSpark please go here:*
aka.ms/founderdating (no charge to join).

As always, welcome feedback (of the constructive sort) and if you have
questions about this opportunity let us know.

On Tue, Dec 18, 2012 at 12:03 PM, Bryan Burke <bryan.t.bu...@gmail.com>wrote:

Clynton Caines SharePoint Developer at Discover Technologies

December 18th, 2012

Sridhar,

With any (reputable) service you use, you should scour the web for
free/low-cost starter packages. There\'s a lot of competition right now.

ex: http://aws.amazon.com/free/

And let us know how it goes, since I\'m sure others are interested.

Clynton

Claudia Perez Business Development at Equiinet

December 18th, 2012

Hello Roby,

A member of the Vegas Tech community and co-founder of Fandeavor gave a
talk about this and the different options. Check out his blog post about it
at: http://techocchio.com/

It might be helpful in determining which solution works best.

Claudia

Max Avroutski

December 18th, 2012

I considered getting a free year of AWS but decided against it since I have to spend time learning it and setting up AWS and in the end it can\'t compete on service or price or reliability or flexibility. So no point wasting time on dealing with it.

AWS give you free year to force you to forget that they suck. Why no one give out free pound of gold to see if you like gold? Because it has value. AWS is nearly useless for a stable service use.

Heroku is even more convoluted nonsense and is a service for incompetent who pose as developers.

Hundreds of companies have good reputation and provide virtual servers that are properly isolated while running together on a particular physical server and allow you to setup many V-servers to model and test your future system and also provide physical server to which you can upgrade. As far as 64-80 Cores and 512-1024GB of ram. Yes, that is One Terabyte of RAM

For info who are the good companies look and post your questions at http://www.webhostingtalk.com
There are hundreds of thousands of developers and service providers. It\'s the biggest forum for talking about internet services.

(Why pay $120-180/TB to AWS if I can get it for $10-40)

Max

--- On Tue, 12/18/12, Clynton <Clyn...@StarGenCo.Com> wrote:

Joel Garcia Software Development on Demand

December 18th, 2012

AWS with ElasticBeanstalk and RDS has worked well for us. The Eclipse
plugin makes it easy to ssh into boxes.

If you\'re hardcore, you can use Asgard, https://github.com/Netflix/asgard

Thanks,
Joel

On Tue, Dec 18, 2012 at 8:55 AM, Rob Sterner <r...@rescuedcode.com> wrote:
> I\'m in the process of migrating production infrastructure away from
> Rackspace onto AWS. We deemed Rackspace to be immature for a variety of
> reasons that I\'ll elaborate on privately if you\'d like.

Michael Brill Technology startup exec focused on AI-driven products

December 18th, 2012

Getting stuff going on Heroku is super-easy, but if you\'re doing work with big data and big RAM, you\'ll probably end up moving away from it as it\'s really optimized for serving up pages to zillions of users, not grinding through tons of data or dealing with large in-memory problems. We had to move our Node.js implementation off onto EC2 because the 500mb/process limit just wasn\'t cutting it.

On Dec 18, 2012, at 11:55 AM, Rob Sterner <r...@rescuedcode.com> wrote:

Max Avroutski

December 18th, 2012

Rent dedicated servers from reputable company if your CPU/RAM more or less constant throughout a month from 20% during a night to 80% peak. Only use Amazon, Azure, ext. if it\'s free or your use is episodic because all of those services are extremely expensive and suffer from performance. Openshift is 1,793% overpriced. Create a plan of what you will do if something will fail and design your service to be able to survive it.

Max

--- On Tue, 12/18/12, Sridhar Alla <chewhttp://groups.google.com/group/founderdating?hl=en.



Sridhar Alla Big Data Architect, Engineer, Trainer and Agile practitioner

December 18th, 2012

Awesome group of awesome people and lots of invaluable suggestions.
I will certainly do my due diligence.

Summary of the discussion

#1 Rackspace is not the optimal choice. so i am going to scratch that off.

#2 AWS looks very good from all the positive feedback

#3 Look into Heroku . Link: http://www.scalacity.com. Beta testing

#4 Look into Asgard, https://github.com/Netflix/asgard. Interesting stuff!

#5 Linode is a good alternative .

#6 Look at Google App Engine. low end suited for prototypes.

#7 Don�t give up on Azure yet J

#8 Rent dedicated servers from reputable company.

Regards,

Sridhar Alla