Fundraising · Investments

At what point should you gamble your company?

Chris Leggitt Software Engineer at NextGenInc

September 19th, 2016

Let's say you are at a point where you have 6 months left of cash and you need to decide if you want to die fast or if you want to die slowly.
More than 65% of new companies fail because they lack funding. In this course, you’ll learn common fundraising mistakes, how to nail an elevator pitch, how to craft a killer pitch deck, where to source investments from, and all about term sheets and convertible notes.

Rod Abbamonte Co Founder at STARTREK / @startupHunter / @startupWay / @CoFounderFound / @GOcapital / @startupClub / @lastminute

September 19th, 2016

Follow Steve Owens, put a plan in place to grow and live forever but also be prepared to die.

Charlton Bilow Finance, Lending and Investment Expert

September 19th, 2016

Die slowly...I'm assuming we're talking about the company's death.

Entrepreneurs often think of business as an "all in" gambling mentality, but it's that kind of decision making process that probably led to this point. Going on luck and throwing money at some marketing campaign isn't likely going to turn things around. Slow, methodical strategy is what is most likely going to give a chance at turning this thing around.

That being said, if net profits are on the other side of this story, are you in a business that has a big enough potential to be worth the effort?

Steve Owens

September 19th, 2016

Put a plan in place to grow strong and live forever.

Samir D'Monte CEO, Clarity 3D Printing

September 19th, 2016

Remember that your time is also a valuable resource. If you believe that your business model is good and has a future, then fight to keep it. If you have learnt through your experiences that it does not, then it is best to exit as quickly as possible.