Company Culture · Office Space

Brooklyn or NYC for office location?

Nate Holbrook Founder / CEO at Lilac

August 20th, 2015

We've just relocated to NYC and looking for office space for our company. Wondering if people think there is an advantage/disadvantage to picking Brooklyn or NYC as a location in terms of hiring (or anything else)?

Michael Barnathan

August 20th, 2015

Brooklyn is part of NYC :) Dumbo and Flatiron seem to be where most of the startup scene is happening in Brooklyn and Manhattan, respectively. Manhattan has more coworking spaces and accelerators, and I'd still consider it to be the better hub for funding and talent.

David K

August 20th, 2015

Proximity to (ideally more than one) subway line is probably more important than which borough you're in. 

Michael Brink Founder at StayHub

August 20th, 2015

Depends on nature of business and profile/number of hires.  If your hires are few and more junior in nature, Brooklyn is perfectly fine and likely where I'd recommend starting.  IMHO, I'd recommend a co-working space (e.g. WeWork) that's housing potentially complementary businesses as a starting place -- the proximity to diverse people and skills will yield you far greater value than the office layout, location or cost.   They also usually take the location guesswork out of the equation anyway (it's their business, after all).

L. Marshall-Smith

August 20th, 2015

Brooklyn could be slightly less expensive, but the talent pool is most likely based  in Manhattan, and may not want to commute to Brooklyn.  

Alison Lewis CEO/Creative Director

August 20th, 2015

The advantages of NYC Midtown is anyone can get to it from anywhere in the city; there are lots of options for start-ups. Almost every subway line goes to midtown in some form or another. The advantages of Brooklyn is usually price, but unless it's on 1-2 stops out of NYC; it can be difficult to get too unless you already live in Brooklyn. Soho house is very nice, but too crowded for daily work and more of a social gathering and meeting place. There are a few WeWorks around the city that work well. Again, NYC places are usually crowded. I highly recommend Workhouse on 46th. When I worked from there, I loved the options, the view, the rooftop and I always had a nice place to meet customers. The decor is nice and it feels professional.

Amy Vernon Audience Development. Community, content & product. Prize-winning journalist & writer. Connector of people & ideas.

August 20th, 2015

Manhattan is far more convenient for most in the NYC metro area, though Brooklyn's not too bad. There are tons of co-working spaces in the borough.  Brooklyn's becoming quite the hub, but many parts have become more expensive than Manhattan, if you can believe it.

Juan Zarco Managing Director, Silicon Valley Ventures Growth Partners llp

August 20th, 2015

Apply the "center of gravity" rule -- from which boroughs will your employees be travelling?  Note that if you select Brooklyn, you might not have many New Jersey candidates, that is why lower Manhattan attracted many employees -- easy access from NJ, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. Bankers and lawyers prefer Manhattan since clients expect them to be there.  Not so in the technology world.  Many investment banks have migrated their IT operations to NJ. Reputable software companies have originated from Brooklyn. I would approach it that way, and then look at the recurring rental costs.