Investors · Business

Can a person get investment on just mockups?

Jermaine McDonald Student at New York University

November 22nd, 2016

Mockups fully details of the designs features and revenue income

Kasandra Clemente Founder/Director, Circle One Visionary Multi-Media Center

November 22nd, 2016

I am also co-creating and co-producing three different projects to be presented locally in Santa Fe, New Mexico--Working with extraordinary youth coordinators and others interested in the third project.  To start with smaller, do-able projects that echo the theme of the larger vision, should begin to get us recognized in the community first.  What do you think?

Chris Cardinal Principal at Synapse Studios

November 22nd, 2016

A reasonable investor is going to want more than just mockups. And "mockups" is a wide ranging catch-all. We typically build out high-fidelity, production-ready prototypes in Invision so that they're wired together so clients can "demo" the product to prospective investors. But even still, investors want to see a business plan, an understanding of the costs that go into building the product, marketing the product, running the business, scaling the business, etc, etc, etc., and mockups don't give enough.

There's a whole spectrum of "minimum viable product" but as far as investment is concerned, the further along you are with being able to demonstrate proof of concept and proof of audience, the better valuation you'll secure and the better chance you'll get an investor interested.

That being said, investors have definitely sunk seed money into just the person running the thing from the scribblings on a cocktail napkin they showed off. 

Doug Winter Founder and Director of Isotoma

November 22nd, 2016

We've developed investment-ready presentations with real UX, branding etc. for startups with which they have successfully gained funding.

Really you need to consider where the value is in your proposition, and where the risks are, and consider what artefacts you need to demonstrate you have what you need.

If the core of your proposition is an amazing new AI algorithm or some clever financial arbitrage scheme then no, this is not likely to be enough.  If your proposition is something where strong UX is critical then demonstrating you have the chops, or have access to those who do, is going to be more important.

Pankaj Nathani Founder at VersionN Studios (http://versionn.com)

November 22nd, 2016

Much depends on your credibility as Steve mentions. If you've mocks ready - you have the UX ready - why not go the extra mile and convert them into a working prototype. Of course, you'll not have actual users - but you could run beta tests and validate your idea with your prototype. With these validations, results and findings from your prototype - you and potential investors can get good insights of the features and the overall product. 

Including these in your deck could really be effective while presenting your business plan to potential investors.

Steve Simitzis Founder and CEO at Treat

November 22nd, 2016

Can a person? Sure, if they have a track record of returning capital to investors. Or if they have a strong personal relationship with an investor who believes in the vision. It happens all the time.

Can you? If you have no investors in your close network, then no, you'll need to prove something first.

Read "Lean Startup" by Eric Ries and start there.

Kasandra Clemente Founder/Director, Circle One Visionary Multi-Media Center

November 22nd, 2016

I agree with both of your comments, Chris.  My vision contains both a "product" and a "service." And I have dedicated three decades to evolve a comprehensive Business Plan and Graphic of the eleven eco-dome visionary multi-media center, with vision, mission,purpose and goals, as well as budgets for a one-dome prototype (of eleven eco-comes) and that template will be used to co-create budgets for each of the domes, until we have a "Master Budget."

Jermaine McDonald Student at New York University

November 22nd, 2016

Chris Cardinal, I try the overseas development but they wasn't capturing my vision and I'm trying to put together a business plan but I do not have much to go on.

Valeriia Timokhina Eastern Peak Software: Custom software development

December 9th, 2016

The best way to validate your idea and raise more solid funding without crowdfunding risks is to create an MVP.
MVP stands for Minimum Viable Product and this is a perfect way to represent your idea to the investors. You can also read this article: Creating an MVP that can get your startup funded