Anti-spam · Internet

Did you get spammed after registrating a domain?

Dimitry Rotstein Founder at Miranor

March 13th, 2017

Last week I registered a new domain via "Whois", and was suddenly flooded with spam emails, offering web development/design services, etc. Most emails mention my new domain, so it's not a coincidence - obviously the spammers saw my registration.

I've registered many domains in the last few years, and never had any problem before, even though I've never used an anonymous registration service. Then again, I've never used Whois as a registrar before either.

So, my question is this - is it something new that is inherent to other registrars as well, e.g. GoDaddy? Or is it because Whois notified the spammers somehow or something? Have you heard anything about this problem before?

Steve Karmeinsky CoFounder City Meets Tech / Lean Capital Ltd / Placeholder Ltd

March 16th, 2017

That's how they grab you, use a reputable domain registrar whois.com

Server Name: WHOIS.COM.AU

Registrar: TPP WHOLESALE PTY LTD.

Whois Server: whois.distributeit.com.au

Referral URL: http://www.tppwholesale.com.au



Domain Name: WHOIS.COM

Registrar: PDR LTD. D/B/A PUBLICDOMAINREGISTRY.COM

Sponsoring Registrar IANA ID: 303

Whois Server: whois.PublicDomainRegistry.com

Referral URL: http://www.publicdomainregistry.com

Name Server: NS1.WHOIS.COM

Name Server: NS2.WHOIS.COM

Name Server: NS3.WHOIS.COM

Name Server: NS4.WHOIS.COM

Status: clientTransferProhibited https://icann.org/epp#clientTransferProhibited

Updated Date: 24-oct-2011

Creation Date: 11-apr-1995

Expiration Date: 12-apr-2021


Domain Name: PUBLICDOMAINREGISTRY.COM

Registrar: PDR LTD. D/B/A PUBLICDOMAINREGISTRY.COM

Sponsoring Registrar IANA ID: 303

Whois Server: whois.PublicDomainRegistry.com

Referral URL: http://www.publicdomainregistry.com

Name Server: ANDY.NS.CLOUDFLARE.COM

Name Server: DORA.NS.CLOUDFLARE.COM

Status: clientTransferProhibited https://icann.org/epp#clientTransferProhibited

Updated Date: 08-oct-2015

Creation Date: 28-dec-2003

Expiration Date: 28-dec-2018


When you register a domain through them, you sign up to their T&Cs which means they can sell you whatever service they allow ...

Joanan Hernandez CEO & Founder at Mollejuo

March 14th, 2017

Dimitry,


Spamming domain owners is as old as the internet itself. Well, a little younger :)


Since whois information is public, it just takes a machine to scan for domain names and their info and boom! you're in an spam list. Thus the need for private registration services.


It can happen with any registrant, maybe "whois" is more prone to this effect. If you don't want to use a private registration, then you need to change the e-mail registered to the domain, because it will be spammed, for sure. Of course, that email must be taken seriously on your part and not just for spam. After all it could be the email your registrant use to verify you. Use with caution.


Best of lucks!

Rogue Startup

March 15th, 2017

I haven't had that problem registering via GoDaddy, NameCheap or SiteLutions. I also create admin email addresses when registering so that my personal email account doesn't get the SPAM.


roguestartup.com

Steve Procter Tech entrepreneur seeks cybersecurity startup team

March 15th, 2017

yep all domain name info is public as others have said. (unless you use one of the available services for hiding your true name behind a proxy).


An entire industry exists in checking on new registrations and then asking if they need stuff. If you opened a new shop next door to mine then it is just the same as me popping round with a welcome bottle of wine. And other businesses calling on you to see if your new business needs help with decorating, business cards, etc. Just politely wave them on their way - but hopefully my approach with the wine will be welcome ;-)


With emails just get used to having to spend 30 seconds each day deleting unwelcome ones. That is just life online.

Mason Richardson Founder/Owner and Engineer

March 15th, 2017

Yep definitely. Some hosting services will have a proxy set up for you though, where someone from that hosting provider's email is listed on the WHOis on behalf of you, and hides all the other information, like your physical address and etc. Hostgator is a prime example of this for me. I haven't received any spam since. Its a very common thing though. I was getting a few emails a week before

Paul Garcia President at TABLE

March 15th, 2017

If you don't take the time to report the UCE (unsolicited commercial email) to the ISPs of the companies sending you junk mail, it won't stop. The advertisements are a violation of the CAN-SPAM Act, unless they're coming from the company with whom you have a business relationship. It's not a new phenomenon, but there are probably several shady businesses watching the name servers of the registrar you chose, and they have automated UCE for any new registrations that are detected. Get them shut down by filing official abuse complaints.

Dane Madsen Organizational and Operational Strategy Consultant

March 15th, 2017

It dies down after a few weeks - as do the phone calls.

Steve Karmeinsky CoFounder City Meets Tech / Lean Capital Ltd / Placeholder Ltd

March 14th, 2017

Whois is a domain service (if you're on a Mac, go into Terminal which is under utilities) and type whois whateverdomain.com

It will show the registry, who registered the domain and through which registrar.


So if you registered through whois (I'm assuming a website) that's just sitting on top of someone else's service (like GoDaddy or another registrar). They may well sell the information on.


Also people do just look for new registrations and then email the registrant

Dimitry Rotstein Founder at Miranor

March 14th, 2017

@Steve Karmeinsky: Whois is also a website that shows you the information on domains, and also offers registration and hosting services. The actual registrar behind it (or partnering with it) is PublicDomainRegistry, but nameservers are on whois.com. Yes, I suppose some registrars could sell the information, even though that should be illegal, and others might watch for newly registered domains. However, I've never had this problem before, so the question is why did it happen this time? Is it the fault of this new registrar, PublicDomainRegistry or whatever they call it, or would it have happened regardless of the registrar?

Steve Procter Tech entrepreneur seeks cybersecurity startup team

Last updated on March 16th, 2017

Spam email is here to stay - get used to it.


I use a spam filtering service called Spamstopshere by Greenviewdata. To give you an idea, I have just checked my quarantine folder on their website (which I never normally do, which is sort of the point). Yesterday they filtered 70 emails which were all spam and malware-looking things - actually quite entertaining looking at some of the subject lines! And yesterday I had just 2 spams that made it through to my inbox - which I simply forward to Greenviewdata so they can update their rules.


(I am not related to Greenviewdata apart from being a happy paying customer. other similar services exist)