Business Development · Competition

How do you know when an industry is too crowded to enter?

Ganesh verma Being a software tester it's my job to act

Last updated on March 30th, 2017

Recently, I read that Blue Apron is preparing to issue an IPO. That surprised me a bit, as I didn’t know the pre-prepared meal delivery market was that big. When I started looking into it, I discovered a number of other companies in this sector, including some I knew (like Plated) and others I didn’t (such as Home Chef). Home Chef, to my surprise, has more than $60m in funding. $60m! I’m flabbergasted to learn there are this many people who are paying to have this service. I would’ve assumed this market would be too crowded with a number of big players. Is there no such thing as a crowded market anymore?

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Greg Bessoni serial entrepeneur looking to network

March 30th, 2017

Not the food market, you have so many tastes and varieties of food and meals, I would think its going to see more players emerge, maybe even trying to distribute the meal delivery model that is distributing the grocery store model. Do you have a specific type of food you want to offer or a different model?

Dane Madsen Organizational and Operational Strategy Consultant

March 31st, 2017

Do not be confused with the amount of funding made and the market size. Everyone wants to be the Google, Amazon, or Facebook so tons of money will be poured into the investments, but there be few survivors. It is why VCs need all investments to show a potential of 1000% return - because they make many bad bets.

Reyner Dsouza Big Data Strategy Consultant and OD Expert

March 31st, 2017

No industry is ever too crowded. It is either open or closed. more like monopoly. They wont let competitors agree. The only way to enter such markets is come up with something disruptive and have selling points that are much different that the actual industry. For example Uber targeted taxi industry and we all know that, but their selling point was ride sharing for everyone. So to answer you question in short, industry doesn't matter, Idea does!

K. Robbins Head Moose at Moose WorldWide Digital

March 31st, 2017

You should read this book:


https://www.amazon.com/Sharks-Without-Being-Eaten-Alive-ebook/dp/B000W5MIEE


Here's a guy who made a fortune selling envelopes. There is virtually zero differentiation between envelope providers... and yet he became a millionaire.