Marketing · Startups

How do you make a name for your business in a market dominated by big players via the grassroots approach?

Anonymous

November 11th, 2016

As a small company we have limited marketing resources so we can’t afford big marketing campaigns in order to draw attention. We are thinking of some cheaper but as effective ways and we found out about the grassroots approach. This approach should save a lot of money by targeting specific group of people and not the whole public if I understood correctly. What is exactly the grassroots approach and what is your opinion about it?
Growth-hacking isn’t about quick wins and shortcuts, although they exist. In this course, we’ll cover the six-step growth hacking framework, how to measure user retention for your business, how to increase engagement and retention, and a bunch of case studies.

Karl Winkelman President Owner at Senior Care Authority South Bay

November 11th, 2016

I have owned a very small business for ten years. It is particular and it is retail. I Import and sell Art from Italy. I wanted to answer because I did try all types of marketing to grow my business believe me and it cost too much money. I decided there was a huge market right under my nose and I was going to grow first, close to home. For me as a small business owner, I have another full time entrepreneur business with my husband, I am happy I changed routes. I focused locally. I attend non profit events, chambers, participate in LinkedIn and other business groups. I cut my marketing costs in half, I have a very steady client base, and I am enjoying the business. I completely depends on how big you want your company to grow. I love marketing by social media but that is a great venue for me because the products are beautiful and make eye catching visuals. The cost if next to nothing but the time invested is significant. Katherine Winkelman Vice President, Winkelman Solutions LLC *Senior Care Authority South Bay* *Points of Life Senior Advocate* 408.658.9465 http://www.seniorcareauthority.com/southbayarea/ *http://www.pointsoflife.org/connect-with-a-senior-advocatecare-experts/* Covering Santa Clara and Santa Cruz Counties Nationwide Network for Senior Assistance

M.H. Lines Inquisitive learner, voracious reader and technology enthusiast

November 11th, 2016

You've nailed it discussing targeting specific group of people.  To do that very effectively you need to look at those specific groups of people who have a unique need that is not served by the large market player.  You want to make sure that you are not just focusing on tools like email or social media but are building a robust understanding of the under served market - like are there features they need?  Is there related industry player you could build an integration with and leverage that to attract customers (and that company's partner network as well).  Then think about how this customer might be different.  If the industry leader is great at email marketing and tele-sales, consider doing a local lunch tour or attending industry events.  Then, once you are providing what they need and speaking to them the way that works, then, you can leverage channels like social or email or events to get traction.

Eti Nachum BlogsRelease

November 14th, 2016

Hello Gerardo,

We help brands to get reviews from top bloggers worldwide- and you pay as success.

Julia Rosa Owner, Satori Online LLC

November 11th, 2016

Mind you, I agree with Roman.  You can still hire someone to do all of your social media.  Outsourcing can be a lesser cost, yet effective.

Andrei Zerebecky co-founder/ creative director at FOUR O NINE

November 14th, 2016

Hi Lucas,  Would you kindly mention a couple of the online softwares you would recommend for tracking marketing campaigns?
Many thanks,
Andrei

K. Robbins Head Moose at Moose WorldWide Digital

November 15th, 2016

These are all good ideas. 

Before spending any money I would talk to my existing customers and ask them how they found you.

David Coleman Principal at Michigan and Beck, LLC dba Brandoogle

November 16th, 2016

I agree with the other posters on this discussion that there are no shortcuts. IT requires time and effort. That said:

Your ability to grow in an environment with dominant players, requires that you 
1) Develop a strong, clear, concise message that resonates with vocal advocates about what makes you different and better (Getting it clear and concise can be very time-consuming)
2) Regularly create meaningful content that re-enforces this message, that can be share and re-shared by your most vocal advocates.

It really doesn't matter how good your product is if you can't get a consistent meaningful message out. MESSAGING MATTERS MOST 

Rob G

November 17th, 2016

Gerardo, before you start your 'grassroots' or gorilla marketing efforts, first take time to clearly and thoroughly understand your competition and your competitive differentiators.  this will help you define and refine your target audience.  A well executed grassroots campaign won't do you much good if 1) you don't know in detail who your ideal prospects are (and where/how to reach them) and 2) if your prospects don't understand how you differ from and are superior to your larger and more experienced competition. You don't say what you are selling and to whom so we don't know if you are selling low $ products or services to consumers  or high $$$ products/services to big companies.  in either case you need to set yourself apart.  Typically small companies can differentiate themselves around service (personal touch) and speed (ability to pivot).  spend time to look VERY closely at your competitors and talk face to face with all the prospects you can find to understand what makes you different (in their eyes) and if/why that difference is important to them.  All the social media marketing on the planet won't do you any good if you are not sending the right message to the right audience. 

Sidney Sclar SID the SECURITY PRO at sidthesecuritypro.com

November 11th, 2016

Connect with Deborah Bowman at clasidconsultantspublishing


Karl Winkelman President Owner at Senior Care Authority South Bay

November 11th, 2016

I own Gioia Italian Art and Products https://gioiacompany.com/home and just sent you this note. K Katherine Winkelman Vice President, Winkelman Solutions LLC *Senior Care Authority South Bay* *Points of Life Senior Advocate* 408.658.9465 http://www.seniorcareauthority.com/southbayarea/ *http://www.pointsoflife.org/connect-with-a-senior-advocatecare-experts/* Covering Santa Clara and Santa Cruz Counties Nationwide Network for Senior Assistance