Android App Development · IOS Development

how much does it cost to build an app like Uber in iOS and Android?

Andrew Reed Cofounder

August 4th, 2017

I want to know the starting cost of taxi app like Uber for iOS and Android. What will be maintenance and upgradation cost attached to it

Jack Larson Business Development Manager

August 4th, 2017

When you think of taxi apps, the first one that probably comes to mind is Uber. Thanks to a sound business model and high customer demand, Uber has seen near-exponential growth in revenue and in its user base.


Estimating the cost of an Uber-like app is kind of moot, unless you know specifically where it’s going to be developed. Are you going to outsource? Developing an app in North America will cost you a lot more than the same project done in India.


Let's have a look at some of the key types and features of the app.


1. Passenger app

  • Booking interface
  • Register page
  • Ride history
  • Payment page
  • Push notification
  • Fare calculator
  • Rating & Review drivers


2. Driver app

  • Book a ride
  • Driver profile & detail
  • Pick up & drop location
  • Booking alert (push notification)
  • Navigation & mapping
  • Fare estimation
  • Rate Drivers
  • Booking history


3. Web Admin panel

  • Trip stats and trip reports
  • Driver stats
  • Active drivers
  • Revenue earning
  • Complaints against active drivers
  • Live events and activities
  • Approval system
  • Payment invoice
  • Mailing system
  • Current active trips
  • Sending out push notifications


These above are the basic feature for any taxi application. The taxi application will cost between $12000 to $17000 as it is the starting application per platform. There is heavy use of GPS navigation and other heavy feature mentioned above. This is one of the most expensive applications.


Maintenance cost depends on uptil what extent you have built it. You have to keep on upgrading your app atleast every year, if we take example of Uber then there is huge change from the first launch to current app. You have to add more and more countries and cities to it. You have to increase type of rides as well features like sharing taxi will also add to your cost. Current exact replica of Uber might cost you $100000 to $150000.


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Eddy Borja Full stack developer with 9 years of experience

Last updated on October 30th, 2017

People are going to give you lowball answers in the tens of thousands. While I don't doubt you can get some uber-like app built overseas by cheap developers, it will almost certainly be a waste of money. I say this as a developer who has spent 10 years in the tech industry and seen tons of hopeful startups make the fatal mistake of outsourcing what should be their core competency.


Here's the truth: Applications like Uber are NEVER finished. There is no finish line you cross after spending a ton of time in development where you get to sit around and enjoy the fruits of your labor. There are constantly new features being added, or bugs being fixed, or updates being made to respond to a changing market or incoming competitors. If this application will be what makes up the core of your business, it is not something you can avoid. Never outsource your core competency.


Thus, the "cost" of building such an application should be whatever the cost of employing at least one full time developer will be depending on how much responsibility that one developer will have. Chances are if you are simply looking for a guy that does "everything", it will easily be in the six figures. Or, the most expensive option: 50% equity


That's not even including ongoing hosting costs, which for a young startup could run anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand a month depending on customer usage (And can only be paid in REAL money unless you get promotional credits).


If the app you are building isn't too important to your business, for example maybe its just an internal fleet management app for your employees and has no consumer facing components, then you can get away with outsourcing it to a foreign shop. For an app like this, once you have something good enough, you're pretty much done. It probably won't be perfect or super polished, but you probably don't need it to be. Most internal business apps are like this.


But if the app is the entire foundation of your business, like Uber, then you have no choice but to build it in-house with developers you hire full time in order to realistically stand a chance at long term success. This will end up cheaper in the end and will not put you at the mercy of whatever dev shop you hire (domestic or foreign). Never outsource your core competency.

Tory Trifanov MAnager

October 30th, 2017

Basic version of an app similar to Ola, Uber’s biggest competitor in India, could cost between $15k and $35k. The time it takes to build a taxi-hailing app is somewhere near 5000 hours. I found it here https://vironit.com/build-app-like-ola-tips-taxi-app-developers/

Hope this will help you.

Rana Umara Azeem Director and ceo

Last updated on August 4th, 2017

On demand Market place app like Uber depends cost $8k- 12k but if you need some specific features like driver verification system apart from SMS like using www.jumio.com or any other 3rd party to scan driving license and payment

maintenance monthly $2k

up gradation depends on fuctionality etc

Vivek Ghai

August 5th, 2017

Andrew,

If you are looking for a basic on demand taxi app on the lines of Uber it will cost you in the range of $15000 to $20000. If you are looking for the exact replica with features such as heat map and share ride then it will cost you in the range of $75000 to $100000.

The maintenance cost along with server cost, Google MAPS API, SMS API cost will depend on the usage of the app, number of rides being booked, etc.

You can contact me if you need any specific information regarding mobile app development.

Cheers

Marc Love Cofounder, Entrepreneur, Team Lead & Sr. Software Engineer

November 1st, 2017

With all due respect to the previous people who answered, all these estimates are beyond unrealistically low.


Could you ask an overseas outsourcing company to "build me an app like Uber" and get such lowball quotes as the ones given to you in the other answers? Sure. But it would be very poorly constructed, be buggy as hell, and wouldn't make you any money.


Building a high-quality app with a server backend that's capable of handling millions of users doing millions or billions of transactions a day would cost you hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Uber had over 1200 engineers in 2016. That number's probably 1500-1800 by now, each costing the company ~250-300k/yr on average in total compensation. That's $450M a year on the low end.


Now if you're talking the MVP of Uber—meaning none of its intelligent routing features, just putting jobs in front of drivers and them self-selecting jobs—you could build it with a team of probably 15-20 engineers: 5 on iOS, 5 on Android, and 5-10 on backend services. You'd have something you could put in front of beta users in ~6 months and a full public release in ~12 months depending on how refined and how feature-rich you wanted it to be.


If you outsourced it completely and you want quality engineers, count on spending AT LEAST $150/hr ($300K/yr), but more realistically $200/hr ($400K/yr). That's $4.5M on the low end. If you hired engineers outside of the Bay Area but still in the U.S. where you can move and work with them and where there's lower cost of living, maybe you could get it down to $125/hr, but still in the several million dollar range.


If you hired your own team—which should at least be your eventual goal—you'll save some money. Early stage startup with some equity…in Silicon Valley you could hire decent engineers for $100-120k, total cost of employment $200-250k...in cheaper locations like Boulder, DC, Seattle, Portland, Austin, or LA you could get equal engineers for $80-$110k, total cost of employment $160-225k. That's anywhere from $2.4M to $5M. But hiring engineers involves recruiting costs and it cheaper locations it can be more difficult (and therefore more costly) to find qualified talent.


And I have to tell you, the costs will only increase once you launch the app to the public. Users expect regular improvements. Market competition demands that you're always iterating, fixing bugs, refining the user experience, etc. Assuming you're successful, your user base will grow and your backend systems will need to scale accordingly. That will require more engineers. How much it will cost to maintain and continuously improve is a function of how fast you grow and how ambitious you want to be in improvements and innovation.


Uber's Angel & Seed round amounted to $1.45M. With that they were able to get just an iOS app out the door in roughly a year. That was 7 years ago when engineers were much cheaper. Lyft was $1.5M and around that same time.


And finally, why should you believe me? I'm a software engineer of 20 years, I'm a former cofounder, I've lead 4 iOS engineering teams in the last 4 years, I've been a consultant for 6 years, and I've recruited and hired mobile and full stack engineers both for my company and for clients' teams.

Maikel Campos I believe things

October 31st, 2017

-Hiring a team, 3 senior programmers to create the app would cost you from 10k to 30k

Amit Tiwari DME at OTS Solutions

November 1st, 2017

No single answer to a question like, “how much do mobile app development cost?” But by working through the considerations listed below, you can reach a clearer understanding of how expensive your project might be.

1 = Who Is Developing the App?

The first question to consider—and the one that will determine much about your approach to the project—is who exactly will develop the app?

2 = How Complex Is the Project?

If you are outsourcing the work to a development company like OTS Solutions, how much you pay them will depend largely on the complexity of the project.

3 = Controlling Costs

No matter the size of your budget, you’ll want to do everything possible to minimize the final cost. And there are a number of effective approaches to limiting the cost of software development, without sacrificing features or quality. Below are some of the most important ones to consider.

4 = DIY Project Management

Even if your organization doesn’t have developers in house, it’s likely that you do have employees with project management expertise. Leveraging their time can be an effective way of limiting the price you pay outside freelancers.

5 = Create a Clear Project Plan

On a similar note, creating a definitive, comprehensive project plan before hiring freelancers will not only save you headaches and heartbreak, it can also save you thousands of dollars.

6 = Limit Feedback and Revisions

Once you start to receive design mocks and prototypes, you will undoubtedly have ideas on how they could improve, and your project plan should account for revision time. However, you should be mindful revisions to a features (particularly once coding has started) can double or triple the time involved, and multiply your costs accordingly.

7 = Take an Iterative Approach

Lastly, many clients begin software projects with bloated lists of requirements that include numerous features their users don’t really need. This is a recipe for frustration, and perhaps more importantly, a surefire way to waste money.

8 = The Bottom Line

As is often the case, you get what you pay for when it comes to mobile app development, and quality isn’t cheap. Whether you pay hourly or flat price your project, you should expect an effective hourly rate of $100, if not more. If that seems steep at first, don’t worry. There are many ways to control your total costs, and a well made app will pay for itself over time.

Liudmyla Kovalchuk Software Development | IT outsourcing | IT outstaffing | Web | Mobile | E-commerce

August 17th, 2017

Hello Andrew,

Your question seems quite interesting and I would like to help you. I guess this article may be useful for you: https://theappsolutions.com/blog/development/cost-to-build-taxi-app/.

If you have any comments, please, let me know. I am always open to help.


Cheers, Liudmyla