Entrepreneurship · Lessons

If you could time travel to day 1 of your startup and have 10' with your former self ....?

Ioannis MSc IT professional

September 28th, 2016

If you could time travel to day 1 of your startup and have 10 minutes with your former self to communicate any lesson that you've acquired what would you tell yourself? Interested to hear all your thoughts and to learn plenty from this entry. Appreciate you all jumping in to share some valuable wisdom.
A great idea is 1% of the work. Execution is the other 99%. In this course, we’ll teach you how to conduct market analysis, create an MVP and pivot (if needed), launch your business, survey customers, iterate your product/service based on feedback, and gain traction quickly.

David Albert Founder & Principal at GreyGoo

September 28th, 2016

Don't fall in love with your ideas just to scratch your own itch. Get out there, talk to people, gauge interest, validate, tweak and be ready to toss an idea if it doesn't feel right. Find examples of where your idea (or similar) ones were done before and failed--and why. Find successes and determine why your idea is different or better--and then make sure that's enough to still be marketable. Don't let pass success fool you into thinking anything new you try will also be a hit--you'll surprise yourself how badly you can fail after a win. Treat people honestly and with respect. End declining relationships before they turn toxic. Drink less, eat more dark leafy greens ;-) Remember family, friends and experiences are more important that business and money. Know that 50% of the crap you spend your time on probably doesn't need the attention you give it. Ask for help, learn to accept help. Always be kind to everyone.

Philip Regenie CEO at Chimera IoT

September 28th, 2016

It is a huge world with both incredible diversity and incredible duplication.  Markets are not won or lost on uniqueness or first to market.  Markets are won, one step at a time.  So my piece of advise for all those listening to the ya da ya da, is have an idea, test it against the marketplace, figure out how to fit in, who to market to, where to build it, at what price and compete till you drop.  Forget about the big win or the instant success.  Believe in you.  Love this:

"Treat people honestly and with respect. End declining relationships before they turn toxic. Drink less, eat more dark leafy greens ;-) Remember family, friends and experiences are more important that business and money. Know that 50% of the crap you spend your time on probably doesn't need the attention you give it. Ask for help, learn to accept help. Always be kind to everyone."

Aditi Avasthi Founder and CEO at embibe (Indiavidual Learning)

September 28th, 2016

Get a co founder and be consumer driven on day one Sent from my iPhone

Shel Horowitz I help organizations thrive by building social transformation into your products, your services, and your marketing

September 28th, 2016

  1. This is not something to tide you over until your writing career gets started--this IS your writing career
  2. Shift earlier to the parts of the business you love
  3. Anchor yourself in a success mindset
  4. Be more public MUCH earlier about green/ethical/social change as business success drivers
  5. Delegate! Don't try to do it all yourself
  6. When clients turn toxic, fire them--better ones will take their place

Josh McCormack Owner, InteractiveQA - Marketing, Web Dev, Testing, Data & Market Analysis

September 29th, 2016

1. Listen to your wife - don't work on any projects with promises of equity. Cash only .
2. Focus a lot more on contracts and project management - change orders, scope creep, etc. 
3. Build up your own cash reserves to provide credit to yourself. That account must always be fluid, even if that requires you working at Home Depot part time. 
4. You'll soon know, if you aren't booked for August or December/January a couple of months ahead of time, you'll be dead slow. Do everything you can to schedule work months out, and if you're not booked, more part time work or perhaps vacation time.
5. Find good people to work for you. Do everything you can to keep them with you. Cut people loose when you're getting nervous about that. Make sure you have great contracts with them, everything in version control, and be ready to cut people loose and tell client you need more time. 
6. Do as much as you can do yourself. Go visit clients regularly, even if you feel like you don't really need to. 

Brendon Whateley Founder at Kugadi

September 29th, 2016

I think a more interesting question would be: "Would you listen to yourself?"