Tech startups · Entrepreneurs

iPhone or Android app for tech startups?

Harpreet Singh Senior QA Engineer (Freelancer)

October 8th, 2016

There are a number of tech startup apps (or startup apps in general) out there but I would like to find out which one (if any) of those is really used by entrepreneurs.

Christoph Ranaweera validate early, pivot and kill fast

October 9th, 2016

That depends but in almost all cases it will be both.
Keep in mind with Android you reach a large population, with iOS large revenues.

If you have a B2B product you have to go for both. If you first want to try an MVP you might want to save cost and evaluate it with one of them - whichever better fits the targetgroup.

To save cost you can use cross platform development frameworks like Xamarin or sencha or phonegap.
However there are basically two approaches you need to understand on those platforms.
1. pure native apps you get from xamarin for example
2. html5 apps with a browser client that you get with sencha for example.

#1 is better for performance and using native apis but as well normally more difficult than the html5 approach

Dan Meier Reimagining manufacturing management software

October 8th, 2016

Both. Xamarin.

Dan Meier Reimagining manufacturing management software

October 9th, 2016

Learning curve for most cross-platform apps using Xamarin.Forms is relatively modest if you're already a C#/.NET/XAML developer because these technologies are the basis for Xamarin.Forms.  Xamarin.Forms abstracts iOS and Android (and Windows Phone) down to a common set of UI elements and behaviors, all of which you can code to using familiar C#/.NET/XAML. However, if more fine-grained control over the UI is needed (i.e., games, etc.), Xamarin allows access to the native iOS and Android UI elements. While this requires more custom code at the UI level, you can still write common code for the rest of the app (outside the UI) in C#.  Either way -- using the abstracted Xamarin.Forms or Xamarin with direct access to iOS and Android UI elements -- you compile down to a fully native app and get native app performance.  For many projects it's code-once, deploy anywhere!

Simon Brown

October 9th, 2016

What the investment in time to get up to speed with Xamarin. I'm a .NET, C#, Visual Studio kinda guy - thanks.