Minimum Viable Product

Is this the most useful strategic ideagram that 99% of startups still need to learn?

Ian Morrison

December 30th, 2015

See the definition of an MVP

This picture does tell a thousand words.

Really - it's the toughest concept to remember every day in our exuberance to take over the world, and the one lesson that would save so many heartaches.

Any war stories to share?
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Lonnie Sciambi

January 9th, 2016

I really like the ideagram. The biggest problem with Lean Start-up principles is that often gives entrepreneurs an excuse to not think things through.  MVP should include the fundamental foundation of the ultimate product.  "Throwaways" should be limited, because they are costly at a time when cash is most limited. So, this requires a lot of thought before a lot of action and a lot of prospective customer interaction along the way.  Here's an old blog post that might help further - http://bit.ly/1ZTx0bk

Sam Hermans Information Security | Risk Management | Founder at Lumturio.com

December 30th, 2015

The image you provided is often used to show differences in Agile vs Waterfall development processes and has been going around for some time now.

You could even go further and say that instead of trying to build a skateboard, just go out and convince customers before building anything.

This blog post explains it quite nicely:
The startup framework to validate your idea before you spend $1




Ian Morrison

January 9th, 2016

You use a phrase I can relate to - "an excuse to not think things through". In engineering, the agile methodology beloved of hotshot engineers can be that parallel excuse. Experienced programmers just dive in, confident that their technology skills will see them thru. Our challenge is however that most problems are design problems, not technology problems and there is no substitute for some old fashioned thinking.

Faisal Memon iOS Department Technical Lead at Citrix ShareFile Quick Edit

January 9th, 2016

One thing I like about the diagram is that each item is of value in its own right so can form the basis of cash flow used to develop the next more advanced product.  Take the example of the bicycle company, who understood that human power is a lightweight power source they could use when building their dream : the first powered aeroplane 
 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wright_brothers

I agree with Lonnie, to try to avoid these steps being throwaways -- they have to have value otherwise you are wasting precious oxygen for the journey.

Ian Morrison

January 4th, 2016

I actually don't agree with the diagram 100%. It does provide useful conversation starter. If you know what you wanna build then you should go straight for it. So many throwaways along the agile path can be expensive.