Entrepreneurship · Finding cofounders

Need advice for getting energetic, responsive and dedicated co-founders.

Shamal Badhe Project Manager @ Companion ITCS

March 25th, 2020

Having good experience in tech freelancing, I've upgraded my technical, personality development and marketing skills. I have got the courage to start my own company or to do a partnership with existing founders.


As per my experience, people are not responding well, looking for immediate results (that's not possible every time.)


I believe, entrepreneurs should have patience, pursue our ideas and do hard work continuously (WITHOUT ANY EXCUSES).


Can someone advise or share their views on this? Help me out to find someone who thinks out of box and belief in partners and their work-style.


Shamal



David M

March 28th, 2020

I have found that everyone has ideas. Everyone is capable of being an entrepreneur. This idea that only a chosen few have what it takes is nonsense. BUT, the real catch that limits most would be entrepreneurs is that they are not willing to put the time and research and work into the process. If you have any idea, first do a thorough evaluation of the opportunity that exists in that idea. This is preface to putting together a professional business plan. If you validate the idea, then build a business plan. I have evaluated numerous business plans as well as written many. I don’t know of any that are competent that are under about 40-50 pages. I have people give me 5 or 10 pages and tell me that is their business plan. No way. Most legit investors are going to want a real business plan and that is extensive. But beyond that, it is the road map for the entrepreneur. My advice would be do an opportunity evaluation on your idea. From there, if you realize it is something you want to pursue and build into a business, write the business plan. Also, don’t get stuck in group hug/think mode with weekend entrepreneurs. They will drain your optimism and passion for no other purpose than to sit around and talk about doing it. Also stay away from anyone who calls themselves a “serial entrepreneur.” An entrepreneur by the very definition is constantly evaluating the entrepreneurship opportunities in the world around. Most, not all, but most self proclaimed “serial entrepreneurs’ are all hat no cattle.

David M

April 1st, 2020

Robin, my opinion is not wrong any more than yours is right. It is my opinion based on my experience so it is absolutely correct as an opinion. That is what opinions are, thoughts and perspectives based on one's personal experience. You are entitled to your opinions as well. Your opinion may be wrong to me, but I can not state finitely it is "wrong" because you are not stating it as a fact. If you state your definition as fact, then I will say you are wrong. So again I will say most, not all, self proclaimed serial entrepreneurs are all hat no cattle. This is based on my reality of what I have seen in the market place. That does not have to be your reality, but I stand by my advice. There are different types of entrepreneurs and at it's most basic definition entrepreneurship is the act of building something. The individual who owns a donut shop is, by definition, an entrepreneur. If they are not innovating they are not an innovative entrepreneur, just like one who innovates is not by default an entrepreneur unless they build something around that innovation. I rarely find those single business owners to tout the fashionably hip title of "entrepreneur." But in a time when entrepreneurship is often more buzz than substance, my experience is there is way too much label wearing. Everyone wants to be an entrepreneur because they read a book on it or watched Shark Tank. And of the self proclaimed "Serial entrepreneurs" I have met I have yet to find one who wasn't trying to get attention more than build businesses. More times than not their advice is terrible and ill founded. Again, that does not mean there are not highly successful entrepreneurs who have founded multiple startups who call themselves "serial entrepreneurs." And you are welcome to spend time googling them and pointing them out. But that will not change my experience for which my opinion and advice was based. In dealing with a lot of successful entrepreneurs in the last 20 years, most who have successfully started numerous companies, some on the Forbes 400 list, some in Silicon Valley with portfolio's of 50+ startups, some with $20B in assets of companies they have acquired and built from mid sized to large companies (still entrepreneurship btw) not once have they referred to themselves as a "serial entrepreneur." Have others referred to them as serial entrepreneurs? Sure...have they? Never...hence if you re read my statement "Self proclaimed."

David M

April 2nd, 2020

Robin, hey I didn't realize you had yourself listed as a serial entrepreneur in your profile. I meant no offense, as I had not read your profile when I responded. We just have a difference of opinion. Oxford's definition of an entrepreneur is one who builds a business or businesses, so based on that definition, for me there is no need to state "serial" Webster does not even have a listing for serial entrepreneur, while Oxford does and states that serial entrepreneurs build many successful businesses often moving on after profitability. Entrepreneur has been around since the mid 1700's, and serial entrepreneur only since the 1990's so again I just don't see the point. It is just difference of perspective. I have grown up around successful entrepreneurs, been one, been a partner of several, earned my Masters from a Top ranked business school in the science of Entrepreneurship, taught entrepreneurship to college seniors...like I say just a term that the legit people I have known or been around never use....but again that is because of the perspective I have that an entrepreneur, os Oxford states creates a business or businesses, and generally most entrepreneurs I know are always looking at the opportunities take on new challenges and build. Use it however you want...and again was not trying to hit a nerve. Make a good name for "serial entrepreneur" if that is your path and counter all the tools out there self proclaiming it. Best of luck.

Robin Mathew Rajan Entrepreneur, Philosopher, Technology Enthusiast (geek) and also a good human being.

Last updated on March 30th, 2020

You're correct on your opinion. Some people think they're built for entrepreneurship, but they're not. Entrepreneurship is a journey not a destination. And for people who set out their journey as entrepreneurs should have guts to seek what they they're seeking for and to travel uncharted waters, while maintaining compassion, empathy and humanity as virtues. The truth is that, very few people are built for that and those few people are thus have the capacity to be the entrepreneurs who can bring constructive disruption to the existing model of world economy.


You are very welcome to join us in our holistic journey as a co-founder. If you have a startup, I'm ready to join your entrepreneur journey as a working co-founder.


My email: robinmathewrajan@gmail.com


Reply to David

You're absolutely wrong on your opinion about serial entrepreneurs. That's your definition of entrepreneurship. I too have a definition of entrepreneurship. You're generalizing a whole set of people which cannot be true.


For example, if I generalize, introverts can't be entrepreneurs, would it be fair? And if I also say, stay away from introverts, would it be fair?


David, please don't generalize people. Do good and allow other people to do good.


Dane Madsen Organizational and Operational Strategy Consultant

April 2nd, 2020

I agree with @David M. Saying you are a "serial entrepreneur" is different than starting and executing on a plan. Describe yourself how you want to, but know that there are many (me included) that discount self description of any sort as puffery. I am getting to a point of rolling my eyes (not always, but some) when I hear a person describe themselves as an "entrepreneur" - but that may just be time and cynicism creeping in. If you do that, and I have an interest in a conversation, I am going to drill into what you have actually done and why you are starting the company.


Tell me what you are going to do and I will remember it for 5 minutes. Show me what you are going to do and I will remember it forever.

Shamal Badhe Project Manager @ Companion ITCS

April 3rd, 2020

@ Dane Madsen

Basically I'm a freelancer having an entrepreneurial mind. I have good experience in technical and marketing fields. I'm looking for founders who I can help and join their firms where I can utilize my skills and grow together.