Computer Science · Product management

Product person looking to learn CS. What online or other classes can I take to learn coding?

Anonymous

January 15th, 2016

I would love some feedback from technical and non technical folks on how to learn CS. Having worked with engineers and designers for a long time I know how to interface but lack the core technical skills. How can I learn coding and which specific classes should I look at given my background

Daniel Marques Director of Application Development at Pragma Securities LLC

January 15th, 2016

Are you looking to "learn to code" to switch careers?  Or to get a better understanding of what software development entails to become a better product manager? Or just as a hobby/out of curiosity?


Bruce Fryer Lean Startup Product Management / Strategy / Marketing with a Flair for Innovation

January 15th, 2016

Hi Noopur,

I believe the best way to learn is by doing.  So you have different ways to go about this.

On the backend side you could learn to bring up a LAMP server (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP), install Wordpress and bring up a website from scratch.  You can get 1 server running for one year for free here: https://aws.amazon.com/free/
(you can also install a server on your home computer, but I like doing it in the cloud to start getting an understanding of distributed systems)

Or use AWS to set up your own personal VPN for free for a year:
https://www.reddit.com/r/VPN/comments/11vmnf/how_to_use_a_freetier_amazon_aws_ec2_cloud_server/

You could also learn JavaScript and build your own mobile app from scratch that runs on a website, iOS and Android using Meteor.  https://www.meteor.com/

Perhaps the blocky Google coding site for kids would be a fun place to start.  It's free and teaching the basics of CS logic: https://blockly-games.appspot.com/





Bruce Fryer Lean Startup Product Management / Strategy / Marketing with a Flair for Innovation

January 15th, 2016

Noopur,

Since you have no background, how about you create a website from scratch (this is free).  Go here:
https://dash.generalassemb.ly/

When done, you'll have an idea of how coding works and get some javascript experience.


Then go here and learn either Java or JavaScript.
https://www.codecademy.com/
Native Android uses Java, native iOS uses Swift (not taught at code academy). 

Or you can start building single page apps using JavaScript and meteor.com that run on everything.
http://code.tutsplus.com/courses/single-page-web-apps-with-meteor



Anonymous

January 15th, 2016

Thanks Sawyer. Maybe I should rewrite the question - specifically how can I learn to code? There are an array of online classes. I was hoping someone could point me to something specific given my background - thanks !

Andrew Aftelak Head of the School of Computing and Digital Technology at Birmingham City University

January 15th, 2016

I would suggest Coursera. https://www.coursera.org/ Andy

Jessica Alter Entrepreneur & Advisor

January 15th, 2016

Good to do a search first there are a lot of conversations on this topic already - just a sample here http://members.founderdating.com/discuss/topic/Coding-Bootcamps


Anonymous

January 15th, 2016

Sure Federico would love to connect !

Steve De Long Learning Faster Than Anyone Else.

January 19th, 2016

dash.generalassemb.ly  (for html, css, and javascript)

codeacademy (I've completed the python track and recently completed both SQL tracks)

Hellowebapp (for a step by step on building and launching an app - uses python and django and includes deployment - there are now two books; beginning and more advanced).
https://hellowebapp.com/

Sawyer Mueller Technology Consultant at Accenture

January 15th, 2016

Hi Noopur, this is a very broad field, so it really depends on what you're trying to accomplish.  If you have a specific product or tech in mind, read some whitepapers--either of the specific product or a similar product.  If not, read up on some Gartner reports and work backwards.  By starting at a high level, you'll learn about the industry, current trends, product/tech specifics and even buzzwords.  But also, you'll begin to identify the relevant building blocks, as well as any fundamental gaps in your understanding, which can be filled later with more research.  Wikipedia is great for general fundamentals and principles. 

Anonymous

January 16th, 2016

Thanks all! Overwhelmed with all the suggestions and looks like this is actually possible so I will give it a try and would love to get some help again from the group if I get stuck :-) Thank you all