CMS · E-Commerce

The ideal CMS?

Kate Hiscox

January 15th, 2014

Comparing the myriad of CMS's out there for a highly scalable set of web services. Should be able to handle;

- Dev, test and production environments with Git or similar
- User registration and management
- Notification engine
- Custom forms
- Data mapping
- API with dev approval
- MongoDB
- Bootstrap 3
- FTP file and media uploads

Would love your 2 cents - 

Duane Nickull Chief Marketing Officer, Co-Founder at Cheddar Labs

January 15th, 2014

Not all of these are mandatory.  For example, why only Mongo DB?  Why not MySQL or Neo4J?  Ideally the web and services tiers should be abstract to the underlying data store.   BootStrap 3 is a View component (From MVC).  As such, it is not really part of a CMS system however nothing in a CMS should ever prevent it from being used.

In general, your definition of CMS may be too encompassing.  CMS is about managing digital assets.  Think of the DAM workflows with mandatory owner, typing, versioning and persistence features.

If you are looking for a specific CMS for an application, I regularly work with people on this topic and have vast experiences with any systems from Drupal to Adobe CQ5.  My company also has their own CMS for PHP users built over Code Igniter called Bacon CMS.

Cheers!

Duane Nickull

Jake Carlson Software Development Manager at Oracle

January 15th, 2014

Kate -- my point is that MongoDB and Bootstrap 3 are very specific technology recommendations (solutions) when we don't know what problem is being solved. Is there some architectural reason (e.g., compatibility with existing codebase) that you listed those items, or are they just things that you've heard are good? 

If no code has been written for your idea yet, then I would back up and tell people what the business requirements are, and then folks can recommend the technology stack they think you should look into. I wouldn't personally recommend any particular database or view layer without knowing the requirements.

Duane Nickull Chief Marketing Officer, Co-Founder at Cheddar Labs

January 15th, 2014

Kate:

It sounds like you are trying to map business requirements to a back end infrastructure.  A CMS system like Bacon CMS or Drupal will likely be able to deliver many pieces of functionality or common design patterns that you require for your application.

When you gather all your business requirements I would revisit the conversation and ask questions like "Why Mongo DB?" etc.

Duane

Tom Maiaroto Full Stack Consultant

January 15th, 2014

Don't get too hung up on the word "enterprise" it's a very misleading and damaging label for CMS (and software in general). Like Jake said, figure out your requirements, goals, and what your future looks like. Then you'll be better able to make a decision about building something custom vs. grabbing something from the shelf.

Open source is great and I would highly recommend leveraging it...But there's nothing that says you can't use an open source framework to build your custom CMS solution. In fact, this is exactly what happens with the larger projects I've worked on over the past 10 years. They ALWAYS move to a custom solution when they outgrow the open source CMS. This is simply because there is no such thing as a one size fits all CMS. You gotta go up a level in your strategy there to the "framework" level that is less pointed and more flexible.

Again though it's going to depend on your requirements...But honestly, if you're building a more robust business/app/product around this codebase. DO NOT reach for a canned CMS. It will end horribly for you. If it's a simple company blog and will always remain so, have at it. Go wild on your WordPresses and Drupals and Al Frescos of the world.

Kate Hiscox

January 15th, 2014

Anthony - no, I have no interest in creating a CMS unless a custom one was required for this project.

Kate Hiscox

January 15th, 2014

Thanks Tom =)

Kate Hiscox

January 15th, 2014

Thanks for the comments all - those requirements are the features of the product itself. It's more a case of curiosity at this point regarding the architecture. I've road tested the concept with potential customers and have them lined up. I'm now actively seeking a technical co-founder(s). With that said, my experience has been that its counter productive to produce a line of code until the team is in place.

Scott Tolstoy Teakah founder

January 16th, 2014

Kate,
From soft development there are two main tech. PHP or .NET that's CMS is based one.
I had experience with DNN and now I am using Orchard (.NET)
here is link for top 7 CMS reviews http://webmasterformat.com/blog/top-asp-net-cmss

regarding MangoDB it can be implemented as separated project to CMS.

Furthermore I would recommend ask your self is CMS will be run in Datacenter, Remote Datacenter(Cloud) 
and price for it.

Scott Tolstoy


Anonymous

January 15th, 2014

Is this with the aim of selecting a CMS or creating a CMS?
If it's regarding creating a CMS the biggest question to answer is: why create another CMS? What does your CMS do to distinguish itself in such a saturated market? Answer that and you'll know what features you need!

Mini brain-storm: 
Machine learning comments moderation.
SaaS architecture and cloud storage.

Kate Hiscox

January 15th, 2014

Jake - thanks for that. I've worked with both Bootstrap and Mongo previously so you are absolutely right. They come from a point of bias which is not an ideal place to be. Thanks for calling me on that - this post should have come from a strictly business requirements perspective.