Startups · Entrepreneurship

What are some of the best pitch deck examples?

Deeptesh Malik System Engineer, Problem Management at CGI

September 10th, 2016

I am doing some research on the best way to put together a pitch deck for an early stage startup. With this in mind, can you point me to some case studies or pitch decks that were used in the past to raise funding with success?


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Irwin Stein Very experienced (40 years) corporate,securities and real estate attorney.

September 10th, 2016

I look at several pitch decks a week. It is easy to spot the ones that use a template. The best demonstrate that the venture can succeed, that the amount of money being sought will be sufficient and that the management team is complete and knows what it is doing. Serious professional investors do not want to hear that you are disruptive or are solving a  problem. The message should be "if you fund me, I'll make money."  And you should be able to back that up with more than a wish and a prayer.

Alejandro Cremades I am driven by solutions to very complex problems.

September 10th, 2016

My favorite pitch decks are the following:

Airbnb - http://www.businessinsider.com/airbnb-a-13-billion-dollar-startups-first-ever-pitch-deck-2011-9#-2

LinkedIn - http://reidhoffman.org/linkedin-pitch-to-greylock/

Square - http://www.slideshare.net/pitchenvy/square-pitch-deck?ref=http://www.pitchenvy.com/pitches/square-pitch-deck/

WeWork - http://www.scribd.com/doc/284094314/WeWork-Pitch-Deck

Irwin Stein Very experienced (40 years) corporate,securities and real estate attorney.

September 10th, 2016

Mr. Taylor: I don't think that you are agreeing with me. I don't care if you are Elon Musk. The strength has to be the business itself.  I represented a group of investors who were scammed into a venture deal. It was sponsored by a VC whose name you would know.  It that had some of the largest VC firms in it because of the reputation of that particular person. He raised 1/2 billion claiming to have a tech that was "deployable today" except that it wasn't.  After the bankruptcy no one even bid on the patents. if you want me to recommend that my clients invest in you, convince me that you have a product that you can deliver, profitably. I get paid to look past the hype. 

Frank Traylor Cofounder at Terra Health Care Labs

September 10th, 2016

I agree with Irwin. I too see a lot of decks and coach a lot of entrepreneurs. Look through some of the decks posted here or at 500 startups or ycombinator. Use the design themes you like. Especially on things like the market slide, graphics help. Personally, I hate bullets, guns don't kill people bullets do. 

Also, organize your deck based on the core strength of your pitch. If you are Elon Musk, maybe start with your name. If your team is fresh out of high school don't hide the team but start with the fact that you have a unique product that people need. Or if you already have a product that's finding great success start with traction. 

All of those things need to be in your deck but you need to grab attention quickly so start with your strength. 

Irwin Stein Very experienced (40 years) corporate,securities and real estate attorney.

September 10th, 2016

Mr. Raimondi let me suggest just the opposite. Start with "we have developed a great product for an identified market.  We have it fully sourced and can deliver at a significant mark-up.. We have a full team in place. We need XXX dollars for marketing, etc. and  expect to bring XXX to the bottom line within 18 months. The product is..."  If you want money, ask for money.  I have sat through hundreds of pitches that were done without slides. If you can't explain what you have and what you want without visual aids you are weak. If you are in a room with VCs they know why you are there. No introduction needed.

Kevin Taylor Hackerpreneur, Advisor to Startups and Consultancies

September 10th, 2016

This is my go-to for a pitch deck:

http://guykawasaki.com/the-only-10-slides-you-need-in-your-pitch/

Sherman Sall Founder at Startency

September 10th, 2016

https://attach.io/startup-pitch-decks/

Burke Franklin

September 10th, 2016

I hear a lot about pitch decks lately -- as if that;s all you need to raise capital. It's been my experience that investors ask a lot of questions, they will interrupt your pitch with questions, they'll ask even more afterwards... While the pitches I've watched were often good, the answers to the questions were terrible! It was obvious the team didn't really think through their business or the deal they were looking for. OK, I created the BizPlanBuilder business plan software -- yes, it's a "template", but using it compels you to consider all aspects of your business, get your team on the same page (imagine the concern investors have when the team isn't!), and assures that you are prepared for the tough questions. An investment is more than a short sprint from meet & greet to pitch to cash in the bank! (Many courses, products, and articles make it seem that simple...) Smart money doesn't cough up cash easily or quickly. The time and effort in 'planning,' that is thinking thru every aspect of your business now and how it will evolve demonstrates its worth over the course of romancing your investors -- The more you have your act together initially, with carefully considered answers to the inevitable questions, will ease the overall process considerably! And you need the advice and contributions of the other guys on this page!

Andre Sr. Managing Partner | Business Funding | Speaker | Mentor

September 10th, 2016

We use the Kiyosaki model. 10, 20, 30 (Ten slides, 20 Minutes, 30 pt font)

Frank Traylor Cofounder at Terra Health Care Labs

September 10th, 2016

The Venture Hacks book is a great resource: http://venturehacks.com/sscx92823jsdxcv8j2s