Advising · Awesome Ideas

What do you think about this Startup Idea? (Eliminating Housework)

Stoyan Vlahovski Entrepreneur by Hearth, Facebook Marketing Specialist, currently studying and a Hustler

Last updated on October 2nd, 2017

The idea is about a company which does all the housework for people and saves them a ton of time.


Many people feel overwhelmed by the amount of housework they have to do because it takes too much of their personal time. Less time for family, friends, hobbies and side projects. What's more, some people hate housework in general.


The company is going to do all the housework for them in exchange of a monthly subscription. As far as the Revenue Model, it would be to sell a lot, a lot of subscriptions with low margin. Unlike the competition we are going to offer everything in one package. Cleaning, grocery shopping, cooking, you name it. Most companies specialise in just one of these areas.


That's why the company is going to use the services of such companies. For example, the subscription includes cleaning, grocery shopping, gardening. One company does the cleaning, another the grocery shopping delivery and so on. One option would be to ask the companies for a small commission for bringing them the clients.


What are you thoughts about this idea?

What could be the potential problems? Any type of feedback would be appreciated.



Michael Docherty Lifelong innovator, corporate exec, and ex-VC

Last updated on October 3rd, 2017

If you are outsourcing all of these tasks to companies in these areas, then you are in essence a broker or a marketplace. It's difficult to start a marketplace as you need a critical mass of 'providers' and 'customers'. It's more complicated when you are offering a broad set of resources vs one niche (initially). Look at Task Rabbit, Thumbtack, Managed by Q and others... most all of these began in a fairly narrow 'niche' to gain initial traction prior to expanding into other services. Trying to simultaneously build out broad array of services sounds very challenging and unlikely to result in high quality providers (in part because you aren't delivering sufficient pipeline of work or margin to attract the best). So that's a challenge.

Additionally, your solution idea is based on bundling services and that seems to be your planned competitive advantage. I'd counsel you to think more deeply about how your solution can be BETTER and not just different. There will be others who offer combined services, so determining how you'll provide unique value to consumer is critical to a sustainable business.

Most important, what's the problem you are solving here and for whom? Very few of us enjoy these tasks, but even fewer can afford to outsource all of them. I think it's great that you have an idea like this, and perhaps it's a problem worth solving. But before you go any further on conceptualizing solutions, spend some time to identify your target market and then conduct interviews with these people (never mentioning your solution) to probe around what their problems are in household tasks/chores that are important enough for you to try and solve for them. If you can identify clearly the problem to solve, the approach to the solution (types of services, business model, etc.) will be much easier.

Then do what Pieter Oliver already rightly suggested, which is to prototype the service in an informal way and see if you can get any takers.

Good luck!

Nabil Lodey Co-founder, Ultrax Ventures

October 4th, 2017

It's a problem for many people (within a certain busy professional / working family) so that's a good start. Lots of good answers above so my three main points are:

-Trust (how do you ensure brand reputation / liability & insurance aspects)

-Cost (how do you make money yet remain affordable. Worth trailing this with a pilot)

-Scale (are you looking at a platform to bring on the specialist skills)

David Phume A thinker and futurist living in a simulation.

October 5th, 2017

startups are developing this trend of creating rules that can be dangerous to creative unconventional entrepreneurs, such as "focus on one niche" , "its too broad", "do one thing first". Yes lean thinking is good and helps as a principle but does that not mean those rules cannot be broken. The future belongs to those who can crack complexity, you are on the right track mainly because people think its to hard. Afterall the heart of your idea is one product that brings many pieces together. You want to serve a cocktail. If you waist your time focusing on one niche that thousands of people are already doing whats the point?, startups are popping up like babies these days to a point were you must either invent some novel technology or a "cocktail" of existing solutions. In your case you want to serve your people with a special cocktail so don't give then plain juice first. Make the cocktail as fast as you can and serve it to just one person then take it from there. Cocktail mixing is an art and discipline entrepreneurs must learn and master in other to cut above the rest.

Francisco Mendoza De La Miyar Founder @ Cargo Click

October 3rd, 2017

So if your outsourcing your work to third party providers, what is keeping them from contacting them directly to cut you the "middle man"? You have to be more of value than just the connector, unless you can come to agreement with third party service providers so that they can not jump you. But if you can offer an all in one cleaning service for a flat fee, then you will have opportunity, the thing is how streamlined will your service be; meaning how many times can they hire your service at the flat fee, will it always be the same service providers, how long will it take for them to complete the job under a fixed budget etc.

jared waters product developer, design, sales, idea enthusiast

October 3rd, 2017

I think you're on the wrong track with a revenue model. Low margin in a fragmented marketplace using dozens of vendors??


The market for that level is cleaning is the 1%. Uber started as a high end car service, scaled and then spread out to a service for the rest of us. I think "Maid on Demand" could work, but take the high margin money first, figure out your operations, build your network and grow from there.

Joanna Bailey Founder + CEO @jbaileydesigns. Strategist, Designer, Advisor. New SaaS project in the works.

October 9th, 2017

I love this concept. It takes a lot of time to vet different services. No one has the time to do it all. Not only do I love the concept, I'd like to be part of it!

Pieter Oliver If you hate potholes and want to help fix it pm me.

October 2nd, 2017

Have you got a mother? Jokes aside sounds interesting.


Do you live with someone? If you do, try it out for someone else so they only pay you a bit and see how you get on. You can easily handcraft the service.

Drew Porter Cofounder Empluse.click, Product Director

October 3rd, 2017

Sounds interesting. Has potential. Competition might include companies like TaskRabbit, Thumbtack, or Nextdoor... I understand that your idea is different and I believe has merit, but it can be challenging when going up against a giant like Thumbtack.


As someone mentioned this being like a marketplace, alternatively take into consideration an Uber type of model for it, manipulated to fit this industry and market of course... essential a user would use the app to schedule an eHelp type of person for "thursday at 3pm", your company would certify the different workers... and reviews would be shared between users and workers, could even incorporate tips.


Message me if you need design help :)


Ananth Avva

October 2nd, 2017

Its actually an interesting idea. There's a lot of niche services (check out: ezhome.com) - but there's a lot of complexity around service delivery / liability.

Anonymous

Last updated on October 2nd, 2017

Great idea! You should post this on Invenst.com and our international community of developers, designers and visionaries can help you accelerate it to a business for free :)