Press · Marketing

What is the best way to leak company information to the press?

Ravi Shah Sr. Software Engineer at Capgemini

November 11th, 2016

We would like to publish some news about our company through unofficial channels. The thing is that it can’t be known that it came from us but still has to be well covered. How do you do this? The information has to be interesting for the media in order to be published, right? Can someone speak from their own experience?
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Chuck Bartok Marketing and Sales Manager at MD Building Systems of Florida, Inc

November 11th, 2016

Sounds like a rosy path to gaining the reputation of an unethical an not credible company.
Playing games is for sophomores.
If you have an announcement be forthright in publishing.
If want to "keep on quite" wait until it can be honestly shouted out.
Way too many neophyte bussiness aspirants get caught up in PHONY intrigue.
Must be a new course in the weak-minded business schools

Josh Kirschner Founder & CEO at Techlicious

November 11th, 2016

Speaking as someone who runs a media company, I'm trying to get my head around what you're asking. You seem to be more focused on the sneakiness of what you're doing than whether the news is even interesting for us to want to publish. And if you're "leaking it", then I probably can't get it verified or provide broader context, which makes us (though not all media companies) far less likely to publish it.

Based on those reasons, as well as the reasons expressed by the other commenters, I suggest you think more about your strategy.

Dane Madsen Chief Operating Officer at Comivo, LLC

November 12th, 2016

Frankly, you will fail. Given this level of ethics breech your entire company will fail. 

Gary Belford Board of Directors Recruiting

November 11th, 2016

Do you have an agreement(s) restricting you from discussing, publishing or revealing through a third party any information regarding your business?  If so, I suggest you honor those agreements...and if the moral reasons don't persuade you perhaps examining the legal reasons may.

Roman Tsukerman Go big or go home

November 11th, 2016

For the sake of argument, let's take a cue from the political sphere and chuck morality right out the window and proceed by having one of your partners/employees fake being fired and then leak whatever "news" it is you want leaked in a rant to whatever online publication covers your industry. I would offer one bit of advice if you plan to snooker the media and/or your customers: Make sure the leaked news leads to a reveal that is so heartwarming/funny/inspiring that your audience forgives you for misleading them and feels in on the whole thing once they find out. Otherwise, things will go poorly.

Vijeesh Papulli Bitten by the 'E' bug. Working on a new project

November 12th, 2016

Your profile says you work for Capgemini and that you are an Entrepreneur. Either you have left Capgemini and forgot to update your profile or you are doing both which might be a problem unless Capgemini has given you a go ahead to do both or you are an Intrapreneur and therefore want to do this for Capgemini. I do not think Capgemini would support this approach being an ethical company of repute. The earlier responders to your query have raised and provided you with some valid inputs. I may be wrong but I think you framed your question in such a way that it gives a negative tone to it. You might want to reframe your question and clarify to the queries already asked by the responders. 

Ian Shearer Executive Chairman at Parakeetplay

November 14th, 2016

Seems to me that the answer is very simple. Contact a media person and tell them that you have a story but it cant be attributed to you. The media person can run the story and does not have to attribute it to anyone, this is normal.
Assuming its a story about your own company and not negative about anyone the media will probably accept the story with just a small amount of third party verification.
I am speaking from experience but I do have the advantage of credibility within my news outlets. If you don't have that credibility the media will need to do more verification.

Sergey Sedykh Entrepreneur

November 12th, 2016

1. Create a different account here and ask some innocent question. And make sure your leak some details about this business.
2. Get involved in discussions on Quora and professional websites in your space, under fake account, telling about the business
3. Get some friendly bloggers to write about the business without mentioning you.

Tom DiClemente Management Consulting | Interim CEO/COO | Coach

November 12th, 2016

My advice from my experience, be honest and straightforward. If you think we don't understand what you're trying to accomplish, give us more information and reissue your question in a way that it sounds more above board.

Perhaps the issue is that you cannot disclose your identities while you're working for Capgemini. I hope you are not violating any agreement made with Capgemini and the further advice is not feasible if you are. There are companies that startup and even start to grow under the radar. In this case, there are two prime choices:

1. Be honest with your media outlets, explain that you are under the radar and not ready to be identified but you have a great story to be told and that they can be on the inside track if they give you assurance that they will report on you anonymously. They will still need to vet you and you cannot reasonably stay invisible to credible media outlets, but if they say they will report without naming the company or source, you can usually trust them to do so. As far as vetting, they will likely want to make sure you are not breaking agreements or laws so that they do not come under undue scrutiny. You may have to show them documents if doing so does not violate any agreements you have.

2. Perhaps you have one partner who is not subject to the same restrictions as the rest of you. That partner can disclose the under the radar company's mission and whatever message you want to get out without naming the company but probably quoting your public partner.

You're starting from a tough stance. I hope you can rephrase your question in a way that I don't read it as somewhat underhanded.

Randy Ortiz Pre-Press Artist at Challenge Printing Co., Founder and Editor in Chief of When Giants Meet

November 15th, 2016

I agree with Vijeesh... too many negatives in this if you ask me.