Management · HR

Best practices to get a former co-founder to sit down and close it out?

Alison Lewis CEO/Creative Director

August 22nd, 2014

Have some one leaving the company. They are communicating, but have not made time to come in and close everything out. There is always an excuse. Any people managing suggestions on how to get the person to meet and finalize docs? Only communication is through text and email at this time. 
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Corey Blaser Sailor. Mormon. Entrepreneur.

August 22nd, 2014

Are the docs necessary for you to retrieve before a separation? Do they contain trade secrets, IP, etc.? And is the equipment a valuable and necessary parts of the business? 

The reason I ask, is that it might be worthwhile to put them at ease, not to mention the expense of retrieving them through courts, to just let your partner keep what is not trade secret/IP/required equipment.

As for just showing up, yeah I would knock on their door. They made a commitment to you when they chose to become partners and communication is one of those commitments that is vital to a company and a relationship. And they have checked out of that relationship. I would suggest having your paperwork in hand, be direct, but do not let your emotions take over. It is scary to approach someone with things like this. And stay calm, collected and don't forget to smile. The last thing you want to do is be perceived as an aggressor in any way by them.

/my two cents

Tom French Founder & CEO, Supply Chain Coach

August 22nd, 2014

Alison; You can continue to be reactive but going to where he lives and having a heart to heart discussion is the proactive way to handle. You had to be friends at one point or you would never have been partners!

Alison Lewis CEO/Creative Director

August 22nd, 2014

- i dont know. seems ok, then silence.then pops back up with emails, then silence and no comments till i press for responses with text messages. 
-  possibly scared and do not want to leave, fear of confrontation b/c they have equipment and docs and i will be asking for it back or payment for it. doesnt want to meet after work, wants to hang with friends and do other stuff.
- i can. yes. send the docs. 
- yes. i can go to them. made offers. 
- yes/no. want to wrap it up.  investors will pressure in Sept. the vested shares need to stop when no work is being done (can be fixed by date). 

I get so frustrated by people who do not communicate. Its my #1 pet peeve. Rather talk and be wrong or argue, then not talk. 

Taimur Khan Creative Media, Business Development, Digital Product Design to Launch - Technology and Media

August 26th, 2014

If turning up at their door and all forms of communications are unfruitful,  then  the relationship has completely broken down and the other party is unresponsive and unwilling to resolve the situation. I would always advise to get everything closed without lawyers or legal action. But then there are instances where without that its impossible and frustratingly waist of everyones time to close. It might be worth asking a lawyer to step in. If the equipment is not returned after your continued requested then could it be corporate theft and police case? 

Chipit Promotions Software Architect

August 22nd, 2014

Give them some money.

Devin Holmes I am in the future business.

August 22nd, 2014

I have a couple of questions to understand the situation a bit more. 

- Is this an amicable departure? 
- why do you think your co-founder is delaying the meeting?
- I assume that just sending them the docs won't work?
- can you go to them rather than having them come in?
- Is there an external deadline and/or pressure to get this done quickly beyond just your desire to wrap it up? (Aka are your investors or customers pressuring you?)

Probably there are other questions but these are the ones that come to mind immediately.  

Alison Lewis CEO/Creative Director

August 22nd, 2014

that is not an option and seeMs very crass. 

Alison Lewis CEO/Creative Director

August 22nd, 2014

that is fine.  Do I just show up unannounced? If no time can be agreed?

Cv Prakash Founder & CEO Gradatim

August 26th, 2014

I second the suggestion that engaging a Lawyer would help, even if you were to engage a lawyer to prepare your documents, more so as you have stated that there are equipments / docs / shares to be taken care of. 
It makes sense to make sure that investors are on your side before you approach and engage directly with your co-promoter.  

Eileen Carey Co-Founder & CEO at Glassbreakers

August 26th, 2014

Put everything in writing.  Explain why you are terminating their position in writing.  Ask for their resignation letter if they are a member of the board.  ask your lawyers.