Developers · Entrepreneur

How does a developer become an entrepreneur?

Jonathan Zazove Product Manager, Entrepreneur

June 26th, 2014

Hi all.  I wrote a blog post for FounderDating about how a developer becomes an entrepreneur.  

Does anyone else think I missed anything?
Has anyone made the switch from dev to entrepreneur or vice versa?




Sean Hurley Strategic Marketing Leader with strong financial results for growing organizations

June 26th, 2014

It amuses me that people think that anyone can be an entrepreneur. An entrepreneur is willing to take risk,while having an innate ability to recognize and capitalize on business opportunities.  It is truly more than just a "state of mind".  It is a talent and ability. Too many wanna-be entrepreneurs have failed as a result of ego driven decision making.

Anonymous

June 26th, 2014

Why switch from developer to entrepreneur? Why not be both simultaneously :) ?

- Jonathan

Anonymous

June 26th, 2014

Being able to develop is a skill, trade, and tool. Being an entrepreneur is a state of mind. I think someone being an entrepreneur has little to do with their skills and tools except for the ease with which such tools aid in the execution of an entrepreneureal vision.

Ayush Jain

June 26th, 2014

I think that being an entrepreneur, it is very important to use your time well and delegate.
Bon has answered right that its a state of mind. 

So anyone can be an entrepreneur. Having a development background can help at some places, such as understanding the language of rest of the development team and be able to communicate with the right tech words.

Hire a marketer, and a developer should be all set

Ideas and Execution

June 26th, 2014

I can dabble as a developer, but I wish I was one. To me, a developer can whip out a prototype of any thought. Once a prototype is there and validated, the world is wide open. People will jump on without any thought. I have tons of ideas, I wish I could code. One thing a developer could do is say, "look to work on a cool project... partnership/equity only required." you will find people knocking down your door. then choose one and learn.

Anonymous

June 26th, 2014

I'll also add that you may benefit well from using a Business Model Canvas to get a concise map of where you're at and what your needs currently are. This can do well to identify which core competencies are immediately required and which have prerequisites.

Sandy Fischler Experiential Marketing Director | Event Producer | Event Management | Entrepreneur

June 27th, 2014

The skill sets between developer and entrepreneur is totally different, as others have noted. Entrepreneur is, yes, a state of mind, but more than that it's a set of skills that allow one to evaluate an idea on the business case merits and decide on a path forward. 

Ideas are dime a dozen, once you start looking for them they are everywhere. What is more rare is the ability to evaluate a market, research demand and competition, test marketing, and come up with a plan to execute (people, materials, funds, services). 

To use someone else's analogy: a builder knows how to build a house, but he/she still has to follow the plans set forth by the architect. An entrepreneur is an architect. He/she decides "I will build this and I will build it here, for this customer." 

Tom Lemmons Founder - Nimbus, Ltd

June 26th, 2014

Sean,  I hear what you are saying but my question is how do I (as a developer/entrepreneur) figure out when/why to bring someone else in.  As a developer I can easily quantify the hard needs for development and/or product design.  As an entrepreneur it is very difficult to figure out what I can do vs what needs I have.  I can of course know that I need legal help to set up the business, marketing help to promote it, but the idea of taking risk and recognizing opportunities is almost self contained.  In other words to hire you or any other partner is in itself a major risk since I cannot quantify what you can bring to the partnership.   In other words how can I figure out how much you can reduce the inherent risk of the project and what that service is worth.

Anonymous

June 26th, 2014

Maybe I am being pedantic, but you cannot fake a state of mind. It naturally emerges from your experience and vision and confidence. If you got it, you got it. Some people have it but don't realize it. That second group are the ones that can "learn" to be an entrepreneur. What they learn is actually more about themselves than any aspect of business.

Tom Lemmons Founder - Nimbus, Ltd

June 26th, 2014

Thanks Sean, but I do have several friends that have proved themselves with multiple startups. My main concern is again quantifying the help they give for any type of payment or reward for their help.