Disruptive technology · Early adopter

What is, in your opinion, the industry that slowest adopt new technology, and why?

Arnt-G√ľnther Dietel Making sales possible anywhere

August 10th, 2016

What is, in your opinion, the industry that slowest adopt new technology, and why?

George Calvert

August 11th, 2016

Legal Services.

They are often paid by the hour, so there's less incentive for task-level efficiency.

Using antiquated technology -- e.g. printing out all the emails requested as part of discovery -- can be a valuable tactic.

Changes to what technology is acceptable / how it can be used can require legislation and case law precedents.

Steve Owens

August 10th, 2016

The Government - they have little incentive (no competition) to be efficient.  

Jesse Hogue Owner, 5280 Pool and Spa

August 10th, 2016

Construction. Fearful and skeptical of technology. Even if a particular firm is open to technology they still have to collaborate with others that resist.

Paul Garcia President at TABLE

August 11th, 2016

I agree with George, lawyers. There is no reward in taking risks, even if the risks result in benefits.

Construction, aerospace, and the government all continually adopt new technologies as it saves them money. They're not slow, just skeptical and motivated by protecting jobs and ROI. Lawyers however often operate like a black box that only lawyers understand, convenience isn't a motivator, and they can always get some underling to do the things they don't want to do or learn to do themselves. Aside from document/records management, a telephone, and the Internet, there's very little technology required to do their jobs well.

Judy Mod CEO + Chemical Engineer = Building Businesses to Fix Complex Problems through the #AccelerationOfInnovation + #AdoptionOfInnovation.

August 11th, 2016

If you make the decision about the "technology" then yes, there are industries/sectors that are more "risk averse."  If, like we do, which is focus on the business problem, that needs to be fixed, and help the company fix it - then the decision is about investing in fixing the problem, not the technology.  This approach removes a lot of the barriers to adoption.  

Kaido Kert IoT, Robotics, Embedded systems

August 10th, 2016

Aerospace had been slow for past few decades, but it is picking up again now somewhat. Industry consolidation slowed things down quite a bit

Lorne [LION] Seeking new clients - Practical Solutions in Action

August 12th, 2016

I agree with Paul and george about the despicable scum.  Ahem...I mean lawyers, LOL!

But I will also add a new one:  real estate agents.  Beyond using the web for listings, they are some of the most technologically inept folks I've run into!  And I have spent 20 years in technology!  In fact, most agents really only went to the web with some decent amount of enthusiasm once there was reasonably simple CMS platforms available.

The only tech that a large number adopted quite readily was email ;)).

Michael Burack

August 11th, 2016

It seems like the sector I am working to disrupt, with a 1.1 trillion per year cash flow:insurance.

Chris Rider (Founder) Director, R&D/Tech at DirtGlue Enterprises, www.dirtglue.com

August 11th, 2016

I'd have to agree with Steve Owens. The Gov't sucks as far as innovation. They leave to to everyone in the private sector. And, as he stated they have no competition and unlimited amounts of other peoples money so they don't care about competition or frugality.

In the private sector I'd have to say the dust and erosion control industry is tough to get to change. Important issues and environmental concerns but many of the major players have the attitude "we've always done it this way in the past why should we change"...

Paul Garcia President at TABLE

August 11th, 2016

It also matters somewhat as to what you mean about the process of technology adoption. Is it that there is no technology for them to adopt? Is it that technology would not offer any significant improvements? Is it that they resist technology when it's available? Is it that technology is broadly available but employees can't be convinced to learn how to use it? Is it that technology is seen to reduce the number of employees needed? There are more reasons that this to be slow adopting technology. What are you actually trying to get at Arnt?